musical: kinky boots

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We went to see Kinky Boots the musical today at the Cadillac Palace theatre. I’d never seen it before, and I know it’s opening in London soon. The biggest draw is that the score is by Cyndi Lauper and it won 6 Tonys including Best Musical. The story is simple: a young man inherits his family’s shoe factory, finds out that it’s on the brink of closure, meets a new friend and saves the factory by producing a very niche shoe while in the process becomes enlightened and accepting.

The kinky boots in question take the form of said niche shoes, thigh-length sparkling boots that are sturdy and aimed at the drag queen market. The idea comes from the new friend, from the outside a flamboyant drag performer by the name of Lola, who is in fact Simon from Clacton. The young shoemaker, Charlie, together with his gruff factory colleagues, are initially uneasy in the company of Lola, but at the end they become a family.

Seems like we’ve been there before. The premise comes from

a line of charming but formulaic British screen successes, in which economic hard times and battered self-worth were alleviated by such means as a brass band (Brassed Off), a male stripper act (The Full Monty), ballet (Billy Elliot) and menopausal nudity (Calendar Girls)

Although the story may be considered predictable, the music is anything but stale. Cyndi Lauper did a great job, the tunes were poignant, catchy, beautiful and grand. The singing was all kinds of wonderful too. A lot of the action took place in one set (the factory) and at times the actor was the only person on stage. The solos were also spread out, with several characters given the chance to shine, and they did.

The only minor negative was the audio. The mics were uneven, sometimes too loud and screechy, sometimes not loud enough that we couldn’t hear what the actors were saying. The accents were inconsistent too. The setting is East Midlands, with some London and Essex. Some of the actors managed British accents better than others. Once I got over it, I focused on the story and music. Accents aren’t noticeable when someone is singing anyway. I noticed small non-British things that shouldn’t be there—a sign in Northampton won’t say “Northampton, England” (emphasis mine) and you can’t give only two weeks’ notice to fire people like in America—these aren’t negatives, just observations.

I was tapping and humming along throughout the musical. At the end, they got the audience on our feet and clapping along. Thoroughly enjoyed it.<