bangkok eating out

colonnade01

More Bangkok prep. We booked sunday lunch buffet at the colonnade restaurant at the sukhothai hotel. It’s supposed to have one of the best buffets in the city. Just look at the pics from gourmetbangkok. There’s all manners of seafood, roasts, sushi & sashimi, Thai food, cheese and dessert.

colonnade02

Apparently they have weekly specials and some diners have enjoyed kangaroo buritto and foie gras. Price is ฿3000 (around US$95), which is on the pricey side for a buffet but we thought we’d splurge out. They have an option of adding ฿1900 for unlimited champagne, which translates to $60. So we’d each have to drink at least one bottle equivalent, and we’d still be out of pocket. It’s a no brainer to decide against it. We can spend the ฿1900 on massages, or go to one of Bangkok’s many rooftop bars. Our hotel is supposed to have one, but not sure if it’s open because the hotel is still in the soft opening stage.

Other than the buffet, we haven’t booked anywhere else. The plan is eat wherever and whenever. Hopefully there will be lots of local and street food. Even food courts are supposed to have good food, so we’re not worried, and we don’t need to spend our effort finding fine dining or Michelin starred restaurants.

Talking about Michelin stars, the first Michelin guide to Bangkok was published in December. 3 two-star restaurants, one of those is Gaggan, which serves modern Indian food. The other 2 are French or European cuisine. Of the one-stars, there’s L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon and a number of French or European restaurants. Pretty disappointed in the Michelin inspectors actually. I mean, I like L’Atelier and all, but I’m not going to go all the way to Bangkok to eat there. There are 6 one-stars serving Thai food, including David Thompson’s Nahm.

jayfai

The one surprise (in that there was only one) is the star for Jay Fai, a streetfood vendor famous for crab omelette and crab curry. The place isn’t exactly street food, in that the restaurant is located in a shop house and not a cart on the pavement. It’s run by 72 year old Supinya Junsuta, who is better known as the eponymous Jay Fai. She cooks her dishes wearing full make up, a beanie and ski goggles to protect against the fiery heat of her woks. Before it received its Michelin star, it was already famous as a go-to eatery. After Michelin, queues of 2-3 hours formed around the block. Now Jay Fai wants to give up her Michelin star because of the attention.

Many people come just to see and take pictures and not necessarily to eat

And she’s had to buy more, and higher quality, ingredients to keep up with the demand, not necessarily increasing her revenue. The constant interruption from journalists and people wanting selfies is taking a toll on her too. Even though it may be fun to visit, and I bet the food is good, we decided to skip it because of the long wait. There’ll be other good food, equally tasty too.