r/mildlyinteresting

Lazy weekend with zero plans, aside from going to the market to stock up on veg. Which I did, and came home huffing because I bought almost exclusively roundish, heavy veg–potato, sweet potato, jicama, kohlrabi, celery (okay, not round), pepper (okay, not heavy). The small supermarket is 33% off, so I bought wine and a pack of 6 fizzy water. Everything in my backpack and one shopping bag; my other hand had to carry the water.

So, what better to spend the rest of the day looking through r/mildlyinteresting stuff.

Top post this week: This library has a directory for topics people might be embarrassed to ask for

librarytoughtopics

Once and again, librarians prove they are wonderful people. A librarian chimed in:

The profession has something called the Code of Ethics which we are all supposed to follow. Part of those ethics are: I. We uphold the principles of intellectual freedom and resist all efforts to censor library resources. II. We protect each library user’s right to privacy and confidentiality with respect to information sought or received and resources consulted, borrowed, acquired or transmitted. III. We distinguish between our personal convictions and professional duties and do not allow our personal beliefs to interfere with fair representation of the aims of our institutions or the provision of access to their information resources.

And of course, some “concerned parents” in Albany, NY saw a version of this poster and complained, saying that the library shouldn’t be encouraging kids to look up this type of information. Luckily, according to the library’s assistant director, they had mostly positive feedback. Hope they don’t buck to the pressure and change or take down the poster. Never cater to the lowest common denominator.

Top post this month: This Toothpaste describes what each of its ingredient is and its purpose

toothpastepurpose

Not as interesting as the library poster, which is why the sub is for mildly interesting things. The interesting thing for me is how water is described as aqua and its purpose is as a moistener. And here I’m reminded that moist is the most hated word in english.

The toothpaste in question is kingfisher, and the mildly interesting factor is I’ve never heard of it before.

Top post this year: Without barriers the British still know how to queue!

britishqueue

Someone recognised it as the O2 arena, so people are getting inside for a concert or something like that. In any event, it’s a long queue and it makes me proud to see the organised snake formation even without barriers. On reddit, people make a big deal (and show a lot of admiration) for the British way of queuing. I think the orderliness appeals to many redditors who are basically introverts and like organisation.

Sometimes I see queues that go beyond the barriers and they deteriorate into an utter mess even though people are trying to queue. In some other places or countries the queue will be a single line that extends to past the main doors and to the outside, very ineffective usage of space. One of the most irritating things to see is a queue for an ATM where people stand right on the pavement and block foot traffic, instead of queuing up parallel to the wall.

That said, the intricate snail-like line at the pokemongo fest in Chicago last summer was a work of art, even though there were volunteers there directing traffic. And I can imagine a similar scenario in Japan, the queue will be even more organised.